5 Rules for establishing a healthy (and abundant) career path

Have you ever felt yourself stressing out about finances, your current career path or your professional value? Do those things make you instantly feel lost?

Perhaps you’re shifting careers, trying to decide what industry to break into, or simply trying to get your foot in the door ANYWHERE you can.

Regardless of where you are, I’ve developed 5 rules for creating career peace of mind that will pull you out of a career crisis. As a professional who’s worked in corporate, freelance and remote environments, and who’s experienced almost every up and down possible in a short period of time, these 5 rules keep me moving forward, thinking positively and ultimately successful no matter what I do! They introduce the routines necessary to find ease in the trajectory of your career.

 

1. Keep planting seeds

OK – I’m not talking about a real garden here. What I mean is to continually plant seeds in your professional garden. This includes expanding your professional network, following industry trends and job postings, growing your “extra curricular” activities and perfecting your unpaid creative endeavors.

Most opportunities won’t come from blind online applications, they’ll come from the people you’ve met and talked to in person or the passions you’ve perfected. The more you create, the higher chances of success you’ll have. Finally – always imply that you have time for new opportunities when talking to friends and family. Next time someone thinks of a recommendation, they might think of you!

 

2. Develop career grit 

Be ruthless. I’m serious about this one. Whether you’re in a full-time, part-time or freelance position, don’t allow yourself to accept laziness in the workplace. Give your your projects and your team the energy, focus and attention they need. Trade in softness for authority, maintain your personal voice and hold your team accountable. It’s vital to conquer your own limits and extend past what you believe you can accomplish, which sometimes relies upon others.

Either you’ll be someone who complains at work and finds excuses to stay home or you’ll be promoted based on your work ethic, leadership and unyielding enthusiasm. Be better than the complainers, stay committed and be the BEST at what you do. It’s as simple as that.

 

3. Give yourself more time

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Time is something difficult to accept when you’re starting a new position or career. You think to yourself, “I can’t afford to be paid this little. I need to be earning what that guy is earning and NOW.” The truth is, if you’re first starting your career or even beginning a new position, sometimes you’re going to take home less cash than you want to.

To earn more money, you need to prove you have a backbone in business. Honestly acknowledge your work experience and remember that you’ll have to prove to your future employers (and yourself) the value you provide. Give yourself more time. Don’t rush, you’ll end up doing something you hate. If you need money right away, start an investment fund and watch your dollar bills do the work for you.

 

4. Hold on to the triumphs 

Sometimes we have brief moments of spectacular recognition and then before you know it you’re back to the drawing board, looking for your next big gig. What your parents often forget to tell you, is that your career should be a marathon, not a sprint. Small and large victories will be followed by epic failures. This will go on and on until you retire and then it will become personal successes and failures. This is what life is. If you’re expecting to get your dream job and then watch everything fall into place and see money fill your bank account forever, you’ve been fooled.

Jobs end, gig’s end, people forget what you’ve done and your career “fame” can plummet to the ground. Even the most successful people in the world have “made it,” and then they fall flat again…or the market crashes, or your company falls apart. So hold onto the small advances you make in your career, but put them down when it’s time and find your next adventure with humility. Don’t hold onto that one big job you had or that higher salary you acquired for a previous position. You’ll have an epic journey regardless, just keep conquering your own expectations and find optimism for what awaits you!

5. Don’t EVER compare 

Apple and Orange difference

Comparison is the true thief of joy. In our Social Media worlds, we compare now more than ever before and therefore hold ourselves in contempt for not being as epic as someone else. But how will you ever understand your truth and your strengths if they can’t even accurately challenge someone else’s? What you see ISN’T what you get. There will always be someone better than you and there will always be someone worse off than you, no matter what. You’ll never be able to see yourself in the honest glory that you are if you constantly repeat to yourself,

“I don’t have that,” “I don’t look like that,” “I can’t travel like him,” “They got promoted and I didn’t,” “They make way more money than I do,” “How are they getting paid for drinking a smoothie?”

Your path is completely different from everyone else’s. I know it’s easier said than done, but if you expect your track to perfectly align with someone else’s, you’re not setting yourself up to win. Allow yourself a unique, healthy and abundant journey from start to finish. Forego badgering harmful thoughts into your head. Get off Social Media and read an inspirational book. Do more of what makes you truly happy and use it to find a work-life balance. Find gratitude no matter how difficult it may seem and remember that this chapter won’t last forever. You’re always on to bigger and better things.

If you want to read more about what you truly have to offer, read The Originals by Adam Grant.

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This book will prove to you why the most successful people you’ve ever heard of, weren’t born with some magical gene that transcended them into fame and fortune. They were just like you and me.

Comment below with your own story! Have questions? Comment!

T.

 

 

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Little surprises…

While rummaging through some old documents sitting on my desk today, I came across a letter I wrote while applying for a scholarship through the program I was to study abroad with in Paris. I completely forgot I wrote it, but it was just the surprise I needed. I read this letter and knew I wrote it, but it became so interesting to realize how my mind has evolved since writing it.

Here I am. I’ve applied for internships, worked in television production and spent my senior year trying to soak it all up, but I feel slightly unsatisfied. This letter reminded me of why I am doing all of this work. I’m not trying to get internships at Discovery Communications and others like it because I want money. I am applying to work for these specific companies because of the possibility of travel opportunities. I love cinematography and broadcasting television, but so much of my soul is based from a fire within me to travel and help other species. I don’t just want a job I want irreplaceable experiences. I am going to copy the letter I wrote here, for any of you who may have the same feeling about travel that I do. This is why I travel…this is why everything I am doing matters at all.

“One’s destination is never a place, but a new way of seeing things.” 

Beginning the moment I could understand the written word and recognize rotating images on Animal Planet, Travel Channel and Discovery Channel, I became a restless soul constantly seeking the ever changing and expanding world of endless culture surrounding each corner of the planet. To me, travel became an innate obsession after watching the genocide in Africa, reading about the extinction of the Baiji White Dolphin in the Yangtze River in China and observing the timeless architecture in Paris. In no way would I sit in one place watching the world from behind a screen ever again. 

My curiosity and desire to see the world through the eyes of those living thousands of miles away grows by the day. This has resulted in flying across the world to Reykjavik, Iceland to discover the plentiful landscapes and budding philosophy based on the notion that we must care for the planet the way it cares for us. As my Icelandic tour guide Oli believed, “nature must be preserved completely. Without it, we have nothing.” 

The memory of my travels has resided deep within my heart and has been a privilege that I am grateful for as each day passes. I recognize the opportunities I have been able to grasp; a significant reason why I have chased this Parisian journey so incessantly. My goal is to understand the way the world works. I want to feel what others feel. I want to be out in the field fighting for what is right. 

Without the glories of travel, I believe imagination is limited. Just the way a dog living inside a home cannot experience the softness of the grass, a person cannot respect the differences between her and the foreigner beside her without traveling to culturally diverse countries. In order to develop an true internal acceptance of others, a person must live alongside other less fortunate or perhaps more fortunate cultures. Broadening the knowledge of how the world spins will generate empathy for those living with less. In life, this can be one of the most difficult mindsets to embrace.

I know that travel an be frightening and it can be challenging in more ways than one. This is a life lesson; that which requires bravery will muster the greatest of changes. This is the largest hope for my future: to change, to develop, to be confused, to be uncertain and to learn what it means to make a significant impact on someone’s life. 

Now, I wrote this letter before I traveled to live in Paris for four months. And to be completely honest, my feelings before the semester have only grown more intense. Still, I have learned one special lesson that I never thought I would. Sometimes, us travel fanatics tend to feel unhappy in one place for a long period of time. If we feel upset or frustrated, we look outside ourselves and want to change our environments. Perhaps our problems are from the weather, the air quality or even traffic. After I lived in Paris, I noticed that
some of the problems I would have at home still existed when I lived abroad. So I learned that my little problems weren’t from external sources at all. They were stemming from inside me. So, being here in Southern California once again, I’ve made the distinctive choice to be happy right where I am. I often complain that I want to travel, but the truth is, I am traveling right now. When I lived in Seattle, I was so eager to come here and go to school. That was my biggest adventure to date. I was going to experience college outside of my hometown because I felt just as eager to live in a new place. But a year passed and I wasn’t happy because of things that I couldn’t change. So, I wanted to up and leave once again. But what if changing my environment wasn’t the solution? What if changing my mindset was the answer.

Truthfully, it was my mindset. So reading this letter to myself now, it means something completely different than it did then. I don’t travel just because I want to see new places, I travel because I truly want to help others and make a difference in the world. I want humans to live as one with their planet, not against it. That was the reason buried deep in my heart. It took sifting through the muck surrounding it to find the authenticity I always had, but never saw.

I ended up being offered the scholarship. When they gave it to me, they had no idea their money was going toward me finding myself once again, not just funding a travel-hungry college student.

T.